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Thuja occidentalis

Common Name: Northern White Cedar

Family: Cupressaceae

Collection Number: 
Entry Author:  C. Westring
Description:  A small tree with a pyramidal shape, often with several main trunks
Needles: 
Evergreen, scale-like, on main shoots, 1/4 inch long with long points. Lateral shoots are flattened, 1/8 inch long with short points.
Cones:
Small brown to tan cones with thin, overlapping scales 
Bark:
Fibrous, red-brown to gray. Diamond-shaped patterns are usually apparent
Branching Pattern:  Flattened sprays that are typically aligned vertically 
Height:  30 to 50 feet tall
Conditions/Habitat/Kind of Forest:  Swamps and limestone soils
Range:  North America
Zone: 3
Conservation Status-US/ World Wide:  Not threatened
Uses (Human):  Believed to have cured the men of Jacques Cartier's Canadian expedition of scurvy.  Used by the Indians for canoes.  Today, the wood is used to make shingles.

References:
Dendrology at Virginia Tech
http://www.cnr.vt.edu/dendro/dendrology/syllabus/toccidentalis.htm

UConn Plant Database
http://www.hort.uconn.edu/plants/t/thuocc/thuocc1.html

IUCN Red List of Threatened Species
http://www.iucnredlist.org/search/details.php?species=35759

Petrides, George A. (1972).  Peterson Field Guides- Field Guide to Trees and Shrubs.  Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company




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This page was created by: C. Westring, Muhlenberg College
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Last updated 01/19/05