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Amelanchier arborea

Common Name: Shadbush, Juneberry, Serviceberry
Family: Rosaceae


Description:  This shrub or small tree can be identified by its multiple stems and showy white flowers which appear between April and June.
Leaves:
 Leave are oval and toothed. The underside of the leaf is white and wooly. In the fall the leaves turn yellow-orange to red and are dropped early.
Flowers:
The drooping white flower are supported by a hairy flower stock. They also appear before the leaves.
Seeds: 
The red fruits ripen in June. They then dry out and are tasteless.
Stem:  The multiple stems are erect with grey bark. There can be also be vertical fissures. They young stems are olive green in color.
Branching Pattern:
 Alternate 
Height:  15 - 25 feet
Conditions/Habitat/Kind of Forest:  Shadbush can be found in thickets, wooded swamps, and in low wet areas. It requires moist soil and grows best in full sun to partial shade.
Known Wildlife Interactions: The flowers are either self-pollinated or insect pollinated. The twigs and berries are eaten by squirrels, beavers, skunk and whitetail deer along with numerous species of birds 
Range:  Found in Northeastern United States south to Florida and west to Iowa. 
Conservation Status-US/ World Wide: Not threatened in the U.S. or globally.
Uses (Human): The fruits are high in vitamin C and are used to make jams and jellies.

References:

The Pennsylvania Flora Project.  Botany Department, Morris Arboretum of the University of Pennsylvania.  Accessed:  April 4, 2006. <http://www.paflora.org>

UConn Plant Database. University of Connecticut. 2001. Accessed April 4, 2006. http://www.hort.uconn.edu/plants/a/amearb/amearb1.html

IUCN Red List of Threatened Species <http://www.iucnredlist.org>

Peterson, Roger T., MicKenny, Margaret. Wildflowers: Northeast/ North-Central America. Peterson Field Guides.1996. pg 2

Newcomb, Lawrence. Newcomb's Wildflower Guide. 1977. pg. 314

Redington, Charles B. Plants in Wetlands. Redington Field Guides.1994. pg. 124

 

This page was created by: A. Coiro, Muhlenberg College
Photos by: L. Rosenberg, edited by N. Smith
Last updated 04/25/06