TREXLER LIBRARY SCUTTLEBUTT ARCHIVE: FALL 2012

 

August 31   |   September 14   |   September 27   |   October 12

October 26   |   November 9   |   November 30


Trexler Library Scuttlebutt

Bi-Weekly Update
8/31/12

Encompass Search Is Here!

What is Encompass Search?

Encompass Search is a new research tool that helps you and your students find resources from many library catalogs and research databases quickly and easily, all from a single search box.

When should I use Encompass Search?

Encompass Search is ideal for locating:

    • Paper topics by revealing a broad overview of what's "out there"
    • Representative quality sources (includes a peer-review limiter) in various formats
    • Interdisciplinary information by drawing on resources beyond your existing tools

How do I get to Encompass Search?

Find Encompass Search in the tab area on the library homepage (http://www.muhlenberg.edu/library/) or directly at http://muhlenberg.worldcat.org/.

Library E-Reserves

Why use library e-reserves?

You want to post a large amount of a copyrighted work to your course management system (Blackboard or Moodle) but you think the amount may exceed fair use (10 percent of the work). E-reserves staff at the library will check the copyright status of the work, contact the publisher for permission if necessary, and pay necessary fees within reason. E-reserves staff will then obtain, scan, and post the requested documents to your Blackboard or Moodle account for you. Easy!

You know what titles you want to post, but you don't have copies of them in your possession. E-reserves staff will obtain copies where possible, scan, and post to your Blackboard or Moodle account. Easy!

You don't want to have to scan and post the documents yourself. E-reserves staff will scan and post the documents to your Blackboard or Moodle account. Easy!

How do I take advantage of this service?

Contact Jon Macasevich at jmcasevish@muhlenberg.edu

Infomaniac Tip

Consult the Copyright Genie with your routine copyright questions.

Your wish is its command! Or almost....

Calendar

August 27 - December 13: Herb Block ("Herblock") Political Cartoon Exhibit. Features the late Washington Post Cartoonist Herb Block's work on the theme of democracy. (Level A, Trexler Library)

September 25: In honor of Banned Books Week, Prof. Brett Gary, censorship expert from NYU, will address the subject of the history of censorship as it has evolved through the last 2 centuries up to the present day: "In short, how did we get from the Comstock Laws to the 'anything goes' culture of the present." Co-sponsored by the Provost, Media and Communication Dept., and Trexler Library. (12:45-1:45, Miller Forum)

October 4: A faculty panel composed of Profs. Borick, Jansen, and Malsberger will critique a selection of Herb Block's most famous Washington Post cartoons (see exhibit announcement above). Emphasized in the critique will be cartoons from Cold War era, Herblock's heyday. Co-sponsored by the Political Science Dept. and Trexler Library. (12:30-1:45, Periodicals Reading Room, level A, Trexler Library)

FALL LIBRARY HOURS: Monday, August 27 - Friday, December 14 (excepting Fall Break and Thanksgiving Break)

    • Monday - Thursday 8:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m.
    • Friday 8:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m.
    • Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
    • Sunday 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m.

***Questions? Reply to this email.***


Trexler Library Scuttlebutt

Bi-Weekly Update
9/14/12

Students asked, we listened!

In response to students' requests, library staff hours will be extended post-fall break on Tuesday, October 16 until 1am. When students return from Fall Break, we'll be here for them; they'll be able to use the space and get the resources they need.

Check http://www.muhlenberg.edu/library/about/hoursmaps.html for more information on library hours.

Special Event for Banned Books Week

Banned Books Week, typically held the last week of September, draws attention to books and other media that have been, and are still being, banned, censored, or otherwise withheld from public consumption.

This year, in honor of Banned Books Week, the Provost's Office, Media and Communications Dept, and Trexler Library, are please to co-sponsor a lecture by censorship expert Brett Gary, Associate Professor of Media, Culture and Communication at New York University.

Gary's address will be held Tuesday Sept. 25, from 12:45-1:45 in the Miller Forum, and will trace the general trajectory of censorship in the U.S., from the late 19th century to the present, focusing first on the late 19th obscenity laws that became the main instruments for censors through the middle of the 20th century, followed by a discussion of the legal and cultural issues that define the censorship terrain today.

Invite your students, colleagues, family, and friends, to attend this informed and thought-provoking introduction to censorship in United States.

New E-Reference Books

The library continues to expand its e-reference collection, understanding the value of having quality reference sources at students' fingertips. Here are a few of the latest acquisitions:

Infomaniac Tip

Web-based polling tools are all the rage. Not just because they use technology, but because they allows instant feedback from the class, without students being influenced by how others are voting (a problem with taking a poll by show of hands). The results can be displayed on a screen for all to see.

Some examples (from VCU Center for Teaching Excellence):

Poll Everywhere - Live audience polling can be used with cell phones, smart phones and web.

Poll Daddy - Live web polling, can be embedded in web pages and blogs.

Google Moderator - Web-based tool from Google that permits participant generated questions that an entire group can then vote on and rank.

twtpoll - A polling tool that launches a poll from your twitter account...for those of you that are tweeters.

Are web-based polling tools free? It depends on the product, on audience size, or other considerations.

For nuts-and-bolts demonstrations on how to operate these applications, search by product name on YouTube.

For ideas on how to incorporate these tools into your pedagogy, consult with Ali Herb, Academic Instructional Designer at Muhlenberg.

Calendar

August 27 - December 13: Herb Block ("Herblock") Political Cartoon Exhibit. Features the late Washington Post Cartoonist Herb Block's work on the theme of democracy. (Level A, Trexler Library)

September 25: In honor of Banned Books Week, Prof. Brett Gary, censorship expert from NYU, will address the subject of the history of censorship as it has evolved through the last 2 centuries up to the present day. Co-sponsored by the Provost, Media and Communication Dept., and Trexler Library. (12:45-1:45, Miller Forum)

October 4: A faculty panel composed of Profs. Borick, Jansen, and Malsberger will critique a selection of Herb Block's most famous Washington Post cartoons (see exhibit announcement above). Emphasized in the critique will be cartoons from Cold War era, Herblock's heyday. Co-sponsored by the Political Science Dept. and Trexler Library. (12:30-1:45, Periodicals Reading Room, level A, Trexler Library)

FALL LIBRARY HOURS: Monday, August 27 - Friday, December 14 (excepting Fall Break and Thanksgiving Break)

    • Monday - Thursday 8:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m.
    • Friday 8:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m.
    • Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
    • Sunday 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m.

FALL BREAK HOURS: (Begins at the conclusion of classes on Friday, October 12. Classes resume at 8:00 a.m. on Wednesday, October 17.)

    • Friday, October 12 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
    • Saturday, October 13 - Sunday, October 14 Closed
    • Monday, October 15 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
    • Tuesday, October 16 9:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m.

***Questions? Reply to this email.***


Trexler Library Scuttlebutt

Bi-Weekly Update
9/27/12

Credo Reference: An Authoritative Starting Point for Student Research

Scuttlebutt has said it before and will say it again: Credo Reference is a great starting place for student research. The reference sources (over 700 titles) in Credo Reference are published and vetted by reputable publishing houses (Harvard, Oxford, Routledge).

Here are the newest titles added to this online reference collection:

    • Italian Renaissance state
    • International encyclopedia of marriage and family
    • Homer encyclopedia

Updates:

    • CIA world factbook 2012-13
    • Hutchinson chronology of world history
    • Hutchinson dictionary of scientific biography

Here is a complete title list.

A Follow-Up to Banned Books Week

Scuttlebutt editors want to report on an intriguing (at least to Scuttlebutt) observation made by Dr. Brett Gary in his talk on censorship in America, presented to some 150 students, staff, and faculty this past Tuesday in Miller Forum as part of Banned Books Week. He mentioned that librarians earlier in the 20th century commonly perceived their mission as protecting innocent young people from "pornographic" or otherwise "perverse" publications. Their mission (or the common perception of their mission), thanks largely to the American Library Association, shifted in the latter half of the 20th century to ensuring that readers, especially adult readers, could access information without censorship.

(A history of the shaping of librarian identity in relation to censorship has been explored in a book by Louise Robbins titled Censorship and the American Library. )

Infomaniac Tip

SmARThistory

Smarthistory.org, now part of the Khan Academy, is a free, not-for-profit, multi-media web-book designed as a dynamic enhancement (or even substitute) for the traditional art history textbook. Dr. Beth Harris and Dr. Steven Zucker began smARThistory in 2005 by creating a blog featuring free audio guides in the form of podcasts for use in The Museum of Modern Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. Soon after, we embedded the audio files in our online survey courses. The response from our students was so positive that we decided to create a multi-media survey of art history web-book. We created audios and videos about works of art found in standard art history survey texts, organized the files stylistically and chronologically, and added text and still images.

Calendar

October 4: A faculty panel composed of Profs. Borick, Jansen, and Malsberger will critique a selection of Herb Block's most famous Washington Post cartoons (see exhibit announcement above). Emphasized in the critique will be cartoons from Cold War era, Herblock's heyday. Co-sponsored by the Political Science Dept. and Trexler Library. (12:30-1:45, Periodicals Reading Room, level A, Trexler Library

October 11: Faculty author reception: Jack McCallum's Dream Team: How Michael, Magic, Larry, Charles and the Greatest Team of All Time Conquered the World and Changed the Game of Basketball Forever (12:30-1:30, Fulford Room, Trexler Library)

October 25: Faculty author reception: John Sullivan's Media Audiences: Effects, Users, Institutions and Power (12:30-1:30, Fulford Room, Trexler Library)

FALL LIBRARY HOURS:

    • Monday - Thursday 8:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m.
    • Friday 8:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m.
    • Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
    • Sunday 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m.

FALL BREAK HOURS: (Begins at the conclusion of classes on Friday, October 12. Classes resume at 8:00 a.m. on Wednesday, October 17.)

    • Friday, October 12 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
    • Saturday, October 13 - Sunday, October 14 Closed
    • Monday, October 15 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
    • Tuesday, October 16 9:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m.

***Questions? Reply to this email.***


Trexler Library Scuttlebutt

Bi-Weekly Update
10/12/12

Why Library Instruction?

Prof. Cathy Ouellette has this to say about the value of library instruction for her students:

"Library research instruction sessions aid students in all course levels. At the introductory level, sessions introduce students to disciplinary language and citation styles. For more advanced students, these classes inform independent student research by promoting familiarity with scholarly databases. In historical research, students aim for a mixture of primary and secondary sources that address content (articulating the events that occurred) and methodology (reliance upon a particular theoretical approach). Students learn how to locate a variety of sources, and to assess their usefulness for their research projects."

Banned Books Week: Going Viral

Scuttlebutt received via email a video of students in Prof. Lora Taub's Media and Communication class reading selections from frequently banned books during Banned Books Week. Scuttlebutt would love this video to go viral. What better way to "un-ban" books. Watch it here ... and share liberally!

The Most Challenged/Banned Books of 2011

Scuttlebutt wanted to know just what are the books that are always getting challenged and/or banned outright. Here are the chief offenders in 2011, and why they were challenged.

Infomaniac Tip

Linking Google Scholar to Muhlenberg College

You probably have searched for scholarly resources using Google Scholar from home and wondered how to access the full text, especially when a message pops us asking you to login with a password, or pay $35, etc..

Here's how to make Google Scholar think you're on campus, even when you're not, allowing you unfettered access to JSTOR and Project Muse full text, along with other college-subscribed resources, all from the comfort of home:

1. In Google Scholar, click on the cogwheel in the top right corner of the screen:
2. In the left side menu, click on "Library links"
3. In the box, type "Muhlenberg College" and click the "Find Library" button.
4. "Muhlenberg College - Find Full Text" should pop up below the search box.
5. Check the box next to Muhlenberg College and Click the "Save" button.

Calendar

October 25: Faculty author reception: John Sullivan's Media Audiences: Effects, Users, Institutions and Power (12:30-1:45, Fulford Room, Trexler Library)

November 8: Faculty author reception: Mike Huber's Reasoning with Sabermetrics: Applying Statistical Science to Baseball's Tough Questions (12:30-1:45, Fulford Room, Trexler Library)

FALL BREAK HOURS: (Begins at the conclusion of classes on Friday, October 12. Classes resume at 8:00 a.m. on Wednesday, October 17)

Friday, October 12 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Saturday, October 13 - Sunday, October 14 Closed
Monday, October 15 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Tuesday, October 16 9:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m.


***Questions? Reply to this email.***


Trexler Library Scuttlebutt

Bi-Weekly Update
10/26/12

Library Resources for Center for Ethics Events

A resource guide in support of several of this year's Center for Ethics events is now in place. Library staff will add more resources to the guide in the near future, to accompany events planned for the spring. The guide highlights online materials from the library's research databases, particularly Academic Search Premier, as well as print materials found in Trexler Library.

See especially the resources related to the upcoming screening of two films, The Corporation, showing on October 30, and Nothing Like Chocolate, showing on November 15.

How Open Is Open Access?

When is a publication considered to be "open access"? When is it not? Is there a gray area in the middle?

The Association of Research Libraries has joined forces with other entities promoting open access to provide a quick measure of the extent to which a publication is openly accessible.

The truly open-access publication has all of these features:

    • Free readership rights/access immediately upon publication
    • Generous reuse & remixing rights (Creative Commons license)
    • Author holds copyright with no restrictions
    • Author may post any version to any third-party repository or website
    • Journals make copies of articles automatically available in trusted third-party repositories (e.g., PubMed Central) immediately
    • Article full text, metadata, citations & data, including supplementary data, provided in community machine-readable standard formats through a community standard API or protocol

Infomaniac Tip

Upcoming NITLE Online Seminars

All events are free to Muhlenberg faculty and staff, thanks to our institutional NITLE membership sponsored by the Provost's Office and Trexler Library.

On Thursday, November 1, Edward B. Burger, Francis Christopher Oakley Third Century Professor of Mathematics at Williams College, will lead "Teaching to Fail." This seminar tackles the question of how educators can foster risk-taking and creativity in students and will emphasize the notion of "failing to succeed." "Teaching to Fail" takes place at 3:30 - 4:30 p.m. (EDT). Register by Tuesday, October 30. This seminar will not be recorded.

On Thursday, November 8, "Re: Humanities Alumni in a Networked World" will present a panel of alumni from the Re:Humanities Symposium, an undergraduate symposium on digital media sponsored by the Tri-Co Digital Humanities Initiative. The alumni-Michael Suen (Middlebury College), Pollyanna Macchiano (San Jose State University), Evan McGonagill (Bryn Mawr College), Anna Levine (Swarthmore College), and Jen Rajchel (Bryn Mawr College)-will discuss the relationship between their undergraduate digital scholarship and their current work in a digitally networked world. "Re:Humanities Alumni in a Networked World" takes place at 3:00 - 4:00 p.m. (EST). Register by Tuesday, November 6.

On Friday, November 16, Adeline Koh, visiting faculty fellow, Duke University, and assistant professor of literature, Richard Stockton College, will lead "Race and the Digital Humanities: An Introduction." Dr. Koh will survey the emerging field of race and the digital humanities, including digital projects informed by race, resources for those interested in the field, the genealogy of the field and its theoretical assumptions, and issues to consider in constructing a race and digital humanities project. "Race and the Digital Humanities" takes place at 3:00 - 4:00 p.m. (EST). Register by Wednesday, November 14. This seminar is open to non-members.

On Thursday, November 29, Thomas A. Warger, principal of Thomas A. Warger Consulting and a NITLE Fellow, will lead "The New Information Technology Organization for Liberal Arts Colleges," outlining the changes that are affecting information technology at small liberal arts colleges and their implications for IT staff, library, faculty, students, and others. "The New Information Technology Organization for Liberal Arts Colleges" takes place at 1:00 - 2:00 p.m. (EST). Register by Tuesday, November 27.

NITLE Seminars are open to all active member institutions of the NITLE Network; no additional registration fee applies, but space is limited.

Calendar

November 8: Faculty author reception: Mike Huber's Reasoning with Sabermetrics: Applying Statistical Science to Baseball's Tough Questions (12:30-1:45, Fulford Room, Trexler Library).

November 13: Fall Trivia Night! MC Chris Borick. Submit your team member list at the front desk of the library beginning Nov. 1. Faculty or faculty-student teams especially welcome (7:30-9:30, Level A Concourse, Trexler Library).

November 29: Faculty author reception: Joe Elliott's The Steel: Photographs of the Bethlehem Steel Plant, 1989-1996 (12:30-1:45, Fulford Room, Trexler Library).

FALL SEMESTER LIBRARY HOURS: thru Friday, December 14

Monday - Thursday 8:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m.
Friday 8:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m.
Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Sunday 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m.


***Questions? Reply to this email.***


Trexler Library Scuttlebutt

Bi-Weekly Update
11/9/12

Why Library Instruction?

Prof. Kate Richmond has this to say about the value of library instruction for her students:

"Since research is the foundation of the psychology curriculum, information literacy in embedded in all aspects of the assignments in psychology courses. The library sessions, in particular, provide students with hands-on opportunities to gain and sharpen important literacy skills, including (1) how to determine the type of information needed, (2) how to effectively retrieve such information, (3) how to critically evaluate different types of information, and (4) how to apply information to a specific research task. By strengthening information literacy skills, students not only become stronger psychology students, but they are able to more effectively appreciate psychology's role in a liberal arts education."

Resources for Nov. 15 Center for Ethics Event

Find here library resources to assist with discussions about the film Nothing Like Chocolate.

Copyright FAQ

Scuttlebutt has compiled some of the most frequently asked questions regarding copyright in the classroom:

Can I distribute photocopies of articles in my classroom, or post those articles to Blackboard?

Fair Use allows you to make photocopies to distribute to students in the classroom, and/or post to Blackboard or Moodle (secured sites). The only limitation is that you don't exceed 10 percent of a book, or more than one journal article from a single issue of a journal. In that event, contact Jonathan Macasevich at the library reserves office, and he'll attempt to secure permission for you to exceed that amount. The library has some funding to pay modest copyright fees.

Can I copy from textbooks and distribute to my students?

Textbooks are a sensitive area. It is important to abide by the 10 percent rule here, as copying from textbooks directly impacts the educational market for these books. If you wish to exceed 10 percent of the total, submit a request to Jonathan Macasevich (jmacasevich@muhlenberg.edu) in the library reserves office. He can explore how much it would cost to secure permission from the publisher for you to copy more than 10 percent of the work to distribute to your students. It's worth our asking, especially if the amount is small in relation to the whole of the work. The permissions fees can be modest.

The other option, of course, would be to ask the students to purchase the book.

What about if I want students to read chapters from a book, but am not requiring that they photocopy those pages?

As for students reading a book, and not necessarily asking them to copy it, placing the book on hard-copy library reserves is a good option.

Who can I contact on campus with copyright questions?

If you have any questions or concerns regarding copyright compliance, feel free to email the Scholarly Communication Librarian at kcannon@muhlenberg.edu.

Infomaniac

Syncing Zotero

Do you or your students use the fabulous and free Zotero to store, sort, and cite references for research papers or other projects? Now the references you store in Zotero can follow you to any computer with internet access.

Just follow these easy steps, to make your Zotero library portable:

    • Register at https://www.zotero.org/user/register
    • You will receive an e-mail at the e-mail address you provide when registering. Click the link in the e-mail to activate your account.
    • After registering, from within an active Zotero session on your computer (Zotero must be installed and open), click on the gear icon.
    • A box entitled "Zotero Preferences" will appear. Click on the "Sync" icon in the top left.
    • Type in the username and password you created when you registered and click OK.
    • You are now synced with the Zotero server. Once you have set up one computer to work with Zotero, you can access your library from any computer with Zotero installed.
    • To access from another computer, install Zotero and add your zotero.org username and password.Click the Zotero sync icon to initiate automatic synchronization of this computer with your Zotero server account. As you make changes to your library (add, edit, and delete items), those changes will be automatically synchronized with the Zotero server.

Calendar

November 13: Fall Trivia Night! MC Chris Borick. Submit your team member list at the front desk of the library beginning Nov. 1 (7:30-9:30, Level A Concourse, Trexler Library).

November 29: Faculty author reception: Joe Elliott's The Steel: Photographs of the Bethlehem Steel Plant, 1989-1996 (12:30-1:45, Fulford Room, Trexler Library).

FALL SEMESTER LIBRARY HOURS: thru Friday, December 14

Monday - Thursday 8:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m.
Friday 8:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m.
Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Sunday 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m.

Exceptions:

Thanksgiving Recess

Tuesday, November 20 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Wednesday, November 21 9:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Thursday, November 22 - Sat., Nov. 24 Closed
Sunday, November 25 6:00 p.m. - 1:00 a.m.
Monday, November 26 8:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m.

Finals Week Hours (Library staff unavailable 3:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m.)

Saturday, December 8 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 a.m.
Sunday, December 9 11:00 a.m. - (no close)
Monday, December 10 Open 24 Hours
Tuesday, December 11 Open 24 Hours
Wednesday, December 12 Open 24 Hours
Thursday, December 13 Open until 2:00 a.m.
Friday, December 14 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

***Questions? Reply to this email.***


Trexler Library Scuttlebutt

Bi-Weekly Update
11/30/12

A Trivial Report

Lurking at this year's Library Trivia Night, Scuttlebutt was impressed by the energy and yes, competitiveness, of the 24 competing teams, with 3-6 members on a team. The teams were comprised of Muhlenberg students, with the exception of one faculty team from the Music Dept., and boasted team names like Bad Acids, Sassy-squatch, Car Ramrod, and We Rob Banks.

Kudos to the winning team Richard and the Dachers. This was their second win!

Watch for the next Trivia Night, on Feb. 20, 2013. Faculty, staff, student (or any combination thereof) teams are all warmly invited to participate. Signup will take place starting in early February. Stay tuned for more info.

Citation Tools

Scuttlebutt has observed over the years the frustration many students have in properly citing sources. Fortunately, database vendors have responded by embedding citation tools in many of the most commonly used database. Not so fortunately, these citation tools can sometimes be obscured by other database features. Here are some tips for citing from some of the most popular databases:

Ebscohost (Academic Search Premier, America History and Life, etc.)
Add items to the folder by clicking on "Add to Folder." Click on "folder view," select all, and then click on the email icon. Choose a citation style, type in your email address, and send. The email message will now show the item in the chosen citation style. CAUTION: Citation tools are not 100 percent accurate. Always check against a citation guide or manual.

LexisNexis Academic
Click on the icon that looks like an open book, located to the right of the screen, just above the article. This is the Export Bibliographic References tool. Select a citation style, then select "Display Bibliographic Information in a new window." Export, cut, and paste into your document. Or select other export options to download the citation to Refworks or Zotero.

JSTOR
JSTOR does not have an embedded citation tool, but will export to Zotero or Refworks. Choose Export Citation, then select RIS file for Zotero, or choose Refworks.

Copyright FAQ

Scuttlebutt has compiled some of the most frequently asked questions regarding copyright in the classroom:

Can I distribute photocopies of articles in my classroom, or post those articles to Blackboard?

Fair Use allows you to make photocopies to distribute to students in the classroom, and/or post to Blackboard or Moodle (secured sites). The only limitation is that you don't exceed 10 percent of a book, or more than one journal article from a single issue of a journal. In that event, contact Jonathan Macasevich at the library reserves office, and he'll attempt to secure permission for you to exceed that amount. The library has some funding to pay modest copyright fees.

Can I copy from textbooks and distribute to my students?

Textbooks are a sensitive area. It is important to abide by the 10 percent rule here, as copying from textbooks directly impacts the educational market for these books. If you wish to exceed 10 percent of the total, submit a request to Jonathan Macasevich (jmacasevich@muhlenberg.edu) in the library reserves office. He can explore how much it would cost to secure permission from the publisher for you to copy more than 10 percent of the work to distribute to your students. It's worth our asking, especially if the amount is small in relation to the whole of the work. The permissions fees can be modest.

The other option, of course, would be to ask the students to purchase the book.

What about if I want students to read chapters from a book, but am not requiring that they photocopy those pages?

As for students reading a book, and not necessarily asking them to copy it, placing the book on hard-copy library reserves is a good option.

Who can I contact on campus with copyright questions?

If you have any questions or concerns regarding copyright compliance, feel free to email the Scholarly Communication Librarian at kcannon@muhlenberg.edu.

Infomaniac

Syncing Google Scholar with Library Full Text

Have you noticed a difference searching Google Scholar from campus vs. home? If you said yes, you are not alone! The difference may well be in the amount of full text you are able to access directly from Google Scholar. On campus, you have open access to hundreds of JSTOR and Muse journals subscribed to by the library. Off campus--not so simple.

But you can make Google Scholar think you're on campus, just by using this "proxy" link in place of the regular Google Scholar link.

Proxy: http://0-scholar.google.com.library.muhlenberg.edu

Try it. You'll be glad you did!

Calendar

November 13: Fall Trivia Night! MC Chris Borick. Submit your team member list at the front desk of the library beginning Nov. 1 (7:30-9:30, Level A Concourse, Trexler Library).

November 29: Faculty author reception: Joe Elliott's The Steel: Photographs of the Bethlehem Steel Plant, 1989-1996 (12:30-1:45, Fulford Room, Trexler Library).

FALL SEMESTER LIBRARY HOURS: thru Friday, December 14

Monday - Thursday 8:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m.
Friday 8:00 a.m. - 10:00 p.m.
Saturday 10:00 a.m. - 7:00 p.m.
Sunday 11:00 a.m. - 1:00 a.m.

Exceptions:

Finals Week Hours (Library staff unavailable 3:00 a.m. - 8:00 a.m.)

Saturday, December 8 10:00 a.m. - 12:00 a.m.
Sunday, December 9 11:00 a.m. - (no close)
Monday, December 10 Open 24 Hours
Tuesday, December 11 Open 24 Hours
Wednesday, December 12 Open 24 Hours
Thursday, December 13 Open until 2:00 a.m.
Friday, December 14 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m.

***Questions? Reply to this email.***