Dr. Jonathan Mathias Lassiter

Assistant Professor, Clinical Psychology
Psychology
Moyer Hall
484-664-4312

jonathanlassiter@muhlenberg.edu

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Education

  • Ph.D., California School of Professional Psychology, Alliant International University
  • B.A., Georgia College and State University


Teaching Interests

I conceptualize education as a practice of freedom. I aim to help students critically analyze the world and transform it for the better. I also aim to create an affirming, intellectually stimulating environment, conducive to learning. I work to ensure students are critically engaged and comfortable taking risks toward deepening their knowledge, skills and personal awareness. I am invested in helping students grow holistically as human beings.

Additionally, I mentor students and supervise them in my research lab: Spiritual and Psychological Intersectionality in Research and Thought (SPIRiT). My research team investigates health at the intersections of race, spirituality, gender and sexual orientation.

 


Research, Scholarship or Creative/Artistic Interests

The overall goal of my research program is to investigate and harness culturally-specific resilience and coping factors to reduce health disparities among racial and sexual minorities. My research fundamentally integrates resilience-based approaches and intersectionality theory to shift the paradigm from a pathological model to one of holistic health. Succinctly, I primarily investigate what culturally-relevant resources Black men who have sex with men (MSM) have cultivated to achieve or maintain positive health outcomes in the midst of multilevel (i.e., structural, interpersonal, individual) adversities (e.g., poor access to healthcare, racism, mental health problems). My ultimate aim is to create and disseminate culturally-specific, resilience-based health interventions that will be implemented in Black MSM’s local communities to promote primary and secondary HIV prevention as well as reduce HIV-related negative health outcomes (e.g., depression, trauma, substance abuse).

 


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