Titanium
Titanium is named from the Latin Titans, the first sons of the earth (myth) and was discovered in1791 although the pure metal was not made until 1910. It is found in the sun and meteorites and rocks returned from the moon by Apollo 17 contained 12.1% titanium dioxide. Titanium is the ninth most abundant element in the earth's crust and is most always present in igneous rocks and their sediments. Titanium is produced commercially by reducing titanium tetrachloride with magnesium. When pure, titanium is a lustrous white metal that has low density, good strength, excellent corrosion resistance and is easily fabricated. Alloys of titanium are principally used for aircraft and missile production. Titanium is as strong as steel but 45% lighter. It is 60% heavier than aluminum but twice as strong. Titanium dioxide is used for house paint and artist's paint as it is permanent and has good covering power. Titanium oxide pigment accounts for the largest use of the element.